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The Weather Network – Records may fall when an impressive heat wave ravages the Arctic Circle

Written by Javed Iqbal

Canada’s next heatwave will be a strange one.

If you are looking for warm weather to start your Canada Day weekend, you will need to take the Dempster Highway and walk all the way to the shores of the Arctic Ocean.

WEIGHTS FOR A POTENTIAL RECORD FULL TIME IN INUWIK

It has already been a hot month in large parts of northern Canada, with temperatures well above seasonal for a wide stretch of the region. The heat we have seen is nothing compared to what may come next week.

Inuvik, NWT, may be on its way to tying or crushing its hottest temperature ever recorded before Canada Day.

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A building high pressure ridge over northern Canada will allow the heat to build up throughout the week, with temperatures creeping into the upper 20s and low 30s well above the Arctic Circle.

Some weather models suggest that high temperatures in Inuvik reach 30 degrees before Canada Day on Friday, and come very close to meeting or exceeding society’s highest temperature of 32.8 ° C, a record set twice on June 17. 1999, and again on 20 July 2001.

INCREDIBLY HOT FRYES YELLOW KNIFE AND MELTS HUDSON BAY

People in the Yukon and Northwest Territories have handled some impressive heat so far this year. Yellowknife’s average high temperature so far this month is 22.2 ° C, which is significantly higher than the city’s typical average high temperature of 18.7 ° C between 1990 and 2010.

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The NWT capital has recorded two formidable streaks with high temperatures of 20 ° C or warmer so far this month, with the first streak lasting only two full weeks.

How annoyed is this heat? Consider the fact that Yellowknife has achieved a longer streak of temperatures at or above 20 ° C than we have seen down in Calgary so far this month.

SEE: 30 DAYS WITH ICE LOSSES ON HUDSON BAY

The sustained heat in the north has had a tangible effect on ice melting across Hudson Bay. Satellite images and data both show that ice is melting over Hudson Bay at an almost record pace so far this year.

Hudson Bay typically reaches ice-free or minimal ice cover in late summer.

However, the ice on the Bay is retreating at an astonishing rate this year. Climate scientist Dr. Zack Labe compiled data from the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center and found that the current distribution of ice on Hudson Bay is shrinking at a rate that exceeded almost every other year.

This coming stretch of eerie heat on its way into early July will further melt the ice.

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Javed Iqbal

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